Posts Tagged ‘anthology’

 

This was an article I knocked up for JEA’s Newsletter a few months back, so in the interests of sharing it with anybody who might not have caught it then, I’ll publish it here too.

SO YOU WANT TO PUT TOGETHER AN ANTHOLOGY?

So you want to put together an anthology?

Sounds like a fairly simple straightforward proposition? Well, actually, yes and no.

Assembling an anthology seems to be one of those activities with polarising opinions. Some folks absolutely love it, while at the other end of the spectrum are those who swear they would never do it again. I’m well entrenched in the former camp, but I’ll go into my various experiences with anthologies a little later on.

For now, we’ll deal with basics, and what could be more basic than understanding the terminology, or in fact, exactly what an anthology is.

I’m know I’m not alone in being a little astounded by just how many folks-and here I’m talking about actual authors-who don’t seem to know the difference between an anthology and a collection. This happens with alarming regularity across social media and elsewhere, with somebody making a grand announcement that they have their own anthology coming soon, or such and such is writing stories for their anthology, or I’m putting together a pile of my stories for my anthology. Closer inspection of course, reveals that what said individual is actually referring to is a collection, given all those stories which will be appearing in that book are penned by a solitary author.

An anthology is made up of several stories contributed by myriad authors, while a collection is comprised of several stories all written by just one author. Fairly simple notion, yet one which seems to not be as widely known as it should be.

Then there are those books which feature a fairly heavily weighted percentage of stories by one author, yet also include a few stories from different folk. Technically an anthology per se, but pushing the boundaries of the simple definition there.

Anyway, that’s neither really here nor there; the main point here is if you’re aiming to assemble an anthology be mindful of just what constitutes it. If it is to be made up of all your own stories, well, that’s not an anthology at all. Refer to above points.

I’m no authority on anthos, so don’t take anything I make mention of here as the gospel (except that part about knowing the difference between anthologies and collections-that is the gospel. Can’t expect folks to take you seriously if you don’t learn that distinction); this is more a case of highlighting some of the challenges one might encounter when dealing with them.

Aside from what I’ve already hammered home pretty solidly above, there are no hard and fast rules. Story length is variable, overall book length is variable-that’s all up to the discretion of the individual in charge. Genre, theme, open theme, all of that is wide open to interpretation, unless one has a very clear vision of what they want to present in their particular anthology.

In the event you are specifically searching for submissions and pieces that address a very particular theme, and anything which doesn’t match this criteria won’t be looked at, it’s best to make that painfully clear in your open call. This also relates to genre. If you’re planning on sticking to just the one, make sure that is what you state-again, there are no rules existing that preclude you from having no theme whatsoever and taking stories from every genre under the sun; it might just be a little bit of a harder sell. This is only personal opinion, but an open theme, open genre anthology isn’t something I’d delve into-too broad a scope, no specific defined audience there.

I’m not going to explore the whole accepting submissions, the less fun part of rejecting pieces and providing critique or helpful reasons why certain stories were rejected, or contracts-all of that in itself would be enough to comprise another article-but I may do a follow-up piece later on which does cover all these bases. All of that is part of the process, and perhaps tosses up some of the reasons people hate the compiling of anthologies and wouldn’t do it again for the life of them. Which is perfectly understandable. It can be a challenging process indeed, but like I mentioned earlier, I’m one of those weird folk who dig all of the various elements which are involved.

In any case, once the aforementioned things are all dealt with and in place, one of the most important things with getting your anthology right is establishing a Table of Contents (hereafter referred to as a TOC). That might seem like a no-brainer, but it isn’t merely a case of tossing stories in any which way, or just whacking them up in the order you received them, or something along those lines.

Different people have their different ways of constructing TOCs, but rest assured, the way you arrange this could either make or break your book, and either ensure readers continue reading or pass it up in favour of something else.

This has been well-established before by many others, so I’m just reiterating what has been previously addressed, but I’m a firm advocate of opening up your anthology with one of the strongest stories, if not the strongest, in the arsenal of accepted pieces. I stand by this, whether one is an antho virgin, making their first foray into the assembly of one, or the book you’re constructing is the latest instalment in a long-running successful series. Granted, the latter type might stand more chance of being read by an already established fanbase, but kicking it off with a great story is just going to further cement desire to read on and explore the rest of the stories. As for the former, don’t cruel your chances to gain that readership and build on it, by slapping a TOC together haphazardly and placing what is perhaps a weaker story as the opener.

I’m sure folks have elected to construct their TOC deliberately as such, building up to their best stories in an escalation of quality, tension, or what-have-you depending on genre, but personally I’d never be inclined to go that way. Considering the first few pages of any book are important, you might be able to get away with that with a novel, but not so much anthologies. That kind of slow-burn approach usually leads to story skipping, and ultimately book skipping all together.

And by the same token, don’t do the same in reverse. Having all your best stories gradually winding down until the end of the book features less remarkable ones is liable to engender a negative impact as well.

Before I proceed, I’ll just slip this in here. In an ideal situation, all of the stories selected for your anthology will be stellar pieces, top shelf stuff and whatnot, but in reality, some things are always going to stand out more or appeal to readers most of all. Of course different readers have different tastes, so what one thinks is the best tale may not be regarded as such by another person; it’s all a matter of opinion. Furthermore, if you’ve run one of those anthologies which wasn’t one with a deadline, but rather an open-until-full situation, then you’re left with whatever stories you okayed to fill up the book, and in the grand scheme of things, these might not essentially be the best of the best. There’s a high chance you’ll be contending with a few stories which though solid and well-suited to the particular theme you sought, might fall into that unremarkable category. Constructing your TOC in a certain way to highlight your strengths and distract from any potential weaknesses is a skill you’ll be wanting to cultivate.

Now, back to the last item of the TOC. You want to kick the book off with a bang, and you want to do likewise at the end. An equally strong story as your opener, or your second strongest, or if you so choose, even the best weapon you have in the armoury should be the concluding number. Leave your readers with something memorable, something ticking over in their heads. Hook them right in with the opener, leave them reeling with the closer, and between these two big bookends, keep things interesting and well thought out.

How you do that is entirely up to you, but it could be a case of somewhat similar stories following a logical progression; or it could be starkly different tales chasing one another like some deliberate paradox. Perhaps, if like me, you choose to compile anthologies in the horror genre, you might choose to alternate between shocking and subtle from story to story, juxtaposing brutality with more understated finesse, lulling a reader into a false sense of security before unloading another balls to the wall slugger that leaves them shell-shocked. It is an art form of sorts, and for me, one of the most challenging, yet most rewarding parts of creating an anthology.

There are no sure-fire methods or secrets to ensuring a certain anthology is going to be a bona fide hit, or a big seller, or a massive success. Well, there are certainly ways of shoring up the chances of the book’s success, but even then that is no guarantee. Here I’m referring to bolstering the ranks of your TOC by the possible inclusion of a big name author or more in your selected genre, whether they elect to write something new for it or graciously allow the inclusion of a reprint, but not everybody putting together an anthology is going to be afforded that luxury. Nor is it a guarantee that the name alone will be enough to pull in prospective readers, especially if a reprint is involved. It’s a fair bet diehard fans of said big name author have already come into contact with that story and buying a book on the strength of that alone may not be enough. It’s a gamble, it’s a lottery, it’s a risk.

Since I dwell in the horror domain, and have zero experience with how things operate in say, romance or science fiction or other types of genre, I can’t really wax lyrical on what sort of things are big in their anthology sphere, but I’d imagine, just as in horror, one never knows what is going to be hit and what will be a miss.

Horror itself is a funny entity in that there will be no guarantee in what is going to take off like a rocket anthology wise. Some things seem to be constantly in vogue, while others wax and wane, though innumerable factors may determine whether even those things which have eclipsed trend status and slipped into mainstream acceptance succeed or falter. Once more, if you’ve elected to make an anthology revolving around one of the most popular subjects imaginable, but have a line-up of complete unknowns or newcomers, that’s a gamble. Stacking one side (the theme), while being light on the other (the personnel) is a risky approach which may or not pay off, and same goes for reversing the scenario. Either way, it’s up to the individual to explore and discover what works.

I’ve personally been involved in anthologies in various capacities that represent both sides of the coin; the successful, and those that slip beneath the surface without making much of a ripple at all.

Most folks who know me will be aware that I run a little anthology series which goes by the name of Rejected For Content. This particular entity has been an enormous success, and I’m currently in the process of editing volume number six, such has been the favourable reception to what has pretty much become an unstoppable juggernaut. In its inception, like most ideas kicked around, this was a gamble, an experiment. However, it was a successful one. It dropped at a perfect time into a sea of readers keen to be immersed in the extreme, the taboo, the affronting and sometimes offensive, and from a brainstorming conversation between a handful of folk it went from strength to strength. I wouldn’t hazard a guess as to what else I might have a hand in that would be likely to replicate that success, but inevitably there will be varying degrees of success and failure along the way, and I look forward to that. As should anybody else launching themselves into the world of anthologies. What worked for Rejected For Content won’t necessarily work elsewhere. Its emergence at a time when folks were desiring new levels of extremity assisted it to the point where it now has a hardcore fanbase (and naturally, the opposite end of the scale).

Mere gross-out attempts or shock just for shock value's sake isn't, and hasn't ever been, what Rejected is all about. There has to be solid stories anchoring all of the extremity or it's

Yes, extreme horror has been on the rise for a little while now and continues to be rising, but invariably, like the omnipresent zombies as a theme, it will reach saturation point and folks may start looking around for something else to alleviate that flood of extremity. Nobody has the ability to predict what that something else is going to be, so the best bet in regards to creating your own anthologies is not to follow the same formula and go for the common and overused themes in the hope they’re going to reap rewards, but rather think outside the box a little. Find that something else, even if it is left of centre. As it’s been well-established over the course of this article, assembling an anthology is one hell of a gamble regardless of theme. So rather than borrow from oft-used ideas or try to replicate the success of previous offerings by riding too close to what you suspect made them the hit they were, go for that little something different. The market can be fickle, riding trends isn’t essentially going to reap any reward, but that something different might just be precisely what the market is looking for.

Now, having said that, and having also referred to zombies earlier, I’ll make mention of an anthology experience that tends to go against some of what I just said.

As you might or might not be aware, J. Ellington Ashton Press has been rolling out a series of books in a massive creation that is known as Project 26. This is a collective of books comprised of anthologies, novellas, and novels, covering each letter of the alphabet, coming out in lots of four in completely random letter order.

Among these has been the anthology Zombies: Zero Hour which I took on-board as editor. The particular topics/themes of each book in the project were decided and established quite some time ago, and at the time, I’d have not elected to run with the undead subject, for no other reason other than the fact that they are often over-represented in horror fiction. When the original editor for this book dropped out, I opted to take over it and another one of the P26 anthologies also lacking an editor. Most surprising to me has been the fact that of the two anthologies, and indeed some of the others, the zombie-centric book has been most successful. This either goes to show, that I know absolutely nothing about what is likely to sell, or more likely, that as I’ve mentioned a few times around various places, that zombies are now one of those things which have surpassed mere trend status and comfortably settled their rotting corpses into the mainstream, where pockets of undead fiction fans will always be inclined to read about them. However, that in itself is still no guarantee that a zombie-based anthology is going to be a winner. The books comprising Project 26 have come out with plenty of publicity and attention, alongside teasers and information to prepare readers, excite them and make them look forward to what might be releasing next, so relying on just the notion that it’s zombies selling because zombies sell isn’t really going to push a book far.

 

Putting together an undead anthology with or without established names then letting it loose without any fanfare or press release, or promotion of any sort, and then expecting it to be a chartbuster because, hell, it’s zombies, isn’t realistically going to achieve much of anything. Expectations of success and reality are two vastly different things.

ZombiesZeroHourFinal1

SotS Cover

I’ve had the great fortune to helm anthologies that have garnered decent levels of success, and I’ve also been able to appear several times in anthologies alongside some of the absolute giants of the horror genre, which is an honour and a joy that never gets old, and I’ve also had stories appear in niche anthos that have had very minimal readership, some to the point where they’re no longer in print. Some of the latter were based around themes which I certainly dug, and imagined many others would have enjoyed too, but for whatever reason, the books themselves just didn’t take off at all. All of which demonstrates that there is no guaranteed success, there is no secret that can be unlocked.

So you want to put together an anthology? Go ahead and throw yourself into it. Hopefully some of this will prove beneficial to you. And best of luck.

 

 

Jim Goforth, 2017

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PROJECT 26 ROLLS ON

If you’ve been following the mammoth ongoing Project 26 entity (or alternatively, even if you haven’t-you’d probably have seen an assortment of posts regarding it floating all around Facebook, Twitter and various other places) you would be aware that more P26 books have emerged in recent weeks.

On the off-chance you aren’t up to date with Project 26, I’ll do a quick recap, though elsewhere on this site I’ve laid out what the project is all about. In short, it is a series of books-26 in total, one for each letter of the alphabet. Novels, novellas and anthologies are all represented. Unlike other projects of a similar nature (the whole alphabet represented by books or stories or whatnot) these books are not being released in strict alphabet order, instead they are coming out in lots of four or thereabouts in completely random order, so you’ll never know what is coming next.

In any case, among those recently released are a few where I have involvement in different capacities. Two of these, Slaughter on the Seas and Zombies: Zero Hour, I’m editor for (I’ll just mention here that I wasn’t initally planning to be editor for these, but stepped into the role when the original editor dropped out of the project. I have a story in Zombies, and generally speaking I’m not one to put my own stories in works I’m editor for, hence the disclaimer regarding how I came to be helming those particular books). Nonetheless, both of them are doing well, particularly the latter, despite the fact that it revolves around zombies, which of course many people feel are over-saturating the market, or they’ve had their day or some such shit. Bear in mind though, Project 26 has been in the making for quite some time now, and regardless how one feels about zombies, the truth is, they’ve gone beyond a trend to a mainstay in horror fiction, and there is always going to be a market for material revolving around them. While there may be nothing new under the sun, there are always plenty of ways to put a different spin on things and many of the authors involved in books like this with familiar themes or popular horror entities/monsters/what-have-you have found engaging and unique ways of keeping well-worn paths interesting.

Notions of the undead have fascinated and terrified humanity for centuries, and none more so than those tales revolving around zombies. From the very root of the zombie myth back in Haitian slave days to a saturation through popular culture, zombies have crawled their way up out of their graves, refusing to stay interred.

Now, as their hordes increase and their hungers grow, the undead plagues cannot be stopped. It isn’t just a case of no more room left in hell, now there’s no room left on earth. The apocalypse is here, and it’s time for humanity to abdicate their position as rulers of the planet to those monstrous reanimated ghouls from the tomb.

Humans have had their day. Time’s up. The world belongs to the zombies now. It’s zero hour.

http://smarturl.it/zombieszerohour

 

ZombiesZeroHourFinal1

 

Filled with monstrous entities from the deep, both real and fabled, and sailed by marauding pirate ships with bloodthirsty souls looking to plunder and destroy, the great briny blue of the ocean is one of the most terrifying places imaginable.

With almost three quarters of the earth’s surface covered by sea, this vast expanse is home to myriad horrors.

From hundreds of fathoms down, or lurking just beneath the surface, to brazenly navigating the nautical domain, these deadly threats are just waiting for unsuspecting souls to take to the waters.

So come on, take the plunge, dive on in. The water is fine. What exists within it is another story.

http://smarturl.it/slaughterontheseas

SotS Cover

Elsewhere I have stories appearing in a couple of the others released in those surprise bundles, including the demonic collective Dance With the Demon and the swarming plague of horror that is Insectile Illusion, both anthologies helmed by Toneye Eyenot. In the former I have a piece titled Summoning where a black metal band inadvertently bring forth a malevolent being after messing around with what they think is merely a cool song. In the latter I present Sewer Dwellers which features a thief too smart for his own good, thinking he’s evaded police capture by hiding out in the sewers beneath the city. This cunning fellow is about to discover staying one step ahead of the cops is the least of his worries.

Demons – we all have them. Like a parasitic shadow, attaching itself and penetrating its foul claws deep into your soul, your own personal demon feeds on your fears. Fear – the basest of all human emotions; the one from which all our others gain impetus and purpose – even of love.

Throughout history, the Demon has been projected outwards, given form, given a cornucopia of names and even hierarchies. Truth be told, they are a deeply ingrained expression of our own psyches. Manifesting in a myriad of ways: addictions – physical, mental and spiritual; hatred and prejudice, ignorance and subservience – the Demon lives within us all, and choreographs the dance of life towards death.

As you immerse yourself in the demonic tales within these pages, the question may arise…

How much of yourself have you given away, as you Dance with the Demon?

 

Nothing makes the skin crawl more than skin crawling with insects. Making their way into every orifice, burrowing through flesh to lay their eggs by the million; you, their unwilling host. Swarms invading your home, infesting the streets, devouring crops, bringing disease, famine, and death. If the insects decide to take over, there is next to nothing you can do in defence. Now, keep this in the forefront of your mind as you delve into this entomological excursion. The stories within are guaranteed to have you swatting and scratching at illusive insects as you read the tales these authors have poured into this bug collection from hell. Your own bed, especially, will no longer be a sanctuary as the antagonists of these stories follow you into your nightmares.

But hey, it all just an illusion, right? Right?

 

There have also been releases from Essel Pratt, Roma Gray and Mark Woods to check out as the Project 26 Machine rolls relentlessly on. Be sure to collect them all.

And stay tuned as more releases emerge since among them will be new brutality and bloodshed in the form of the dual monsters known as Carnival of Chaos and Festival of the Flesh.

CARNIVAL

Part one of an ultra-violent, splatterpunk, visceral expedition into a world of revenge, pain, perversion and bloody death. Come along and snare a ticket to this carnival, but proceed with caution. Survival is not guaranteed.

FESTIVAL

Hidden within a seemingly innocuous horror themed carnival exists something far more insidious. Where those with dollars and depraved desires find everything they seek catered for.
Peel away the bright, colourful facade of the Carnival and you’ll find the hideous heart that is the Festival of the Flesh. #P26

COMING SOON

 

JUST ANOTHER UPDATE

In the interests of paying a little more attention to this site, I’ll be posting somewhat more regularly around here. Which means you’ll either get something semi-coherent or an utter stream of complete gibberish. For now, we’ll go with an update.

At the tail-end of last year I posted up a pretty comprehensive list of projects and books I planned to work on in 2017, including roughly twelve novels. The good news there is that two of those are just about written (another one-The Sleep, subject of my last post, of course came out in January) and will see the light of day this year. Because these two are both part of a larger project, I’m not at liberty to release anything in the way of details just yet. While I’ve had fun working on these books, they’ve monopolised a lot of time, and honestly, I’ll be glad to get that shit done and squared away. A whole bunch of different factors have meant I haven’t exactly ripped through the latter book in the way I normally would, so trying to get it done has been moderately frustrating. I dig the characters and the story, but to say I’ll be glad to see the back of it is an understatement. While I’ve been pouring what available writing time I have into trying to knock this motherfucker over, I’ve had numerous other projects sitting on the back burner, some with rapidly approaching deadlines. Fair bet there’s a few other things I’d committed to, or wanted to write for, that have had their deadlines elapse now.

Naturally I’ll announce news on these books and release details when I’m able, but for now, rest assured, at least two new books will be coming this year. Initially when I made the list detailing the various novels I had in the works, or plans to delve into, I’d envisioned having a bit more done by this time of year than I have so far, but you know, best laid plans and all that shit…

The various factors and outside aspects that have impacted on my writing time turned this latest book into something of a fucking albatross around my neck, and I’ve felt like I’ve been moving through it more sluggishly than I’d have liked when I actually do get around to doing any scribbling on it. Fortunately, the end is in sight and I can get it cleared and move on to all those other projects that are piling up like a mountain of fucking unpaid bills.

After I finally get that sorted, my first focus will be on a few short stories for various anthologies that have to get written. The bonus there is I have a story lurking insidiously around in my head for the first of those, and ideally I’d have already splattered this one out in fresh blood or what-have-you, but in trying to get the novel completed, I set myself the rule of only working on it until it’s done, so nothing else gets written until then.

Knock those antho commitments out of the way and work shall commence on any number of novels, either already started, or some new fiendish endeavours. One thing is a given. This beast will be in there somewhere…plebspromo3

There will be a sequel to Undead Fleshcrave: The Zombie Trigger somewhere in the mix too, but that will probably be considered sometime after Plebs 3. I did mention on Facebook at some stage that some folks might get to be in one of these two books, at least in terms of appearing as a character, or having a character named after them etc. etc. I recall a pile of people commenting on that particular status nominating themselves to be in the books, but shit, that was a fair while ago and rather than scrolling through the fuckload of posts that have saturated my timeline since then, I might need to do a refresher and see who was keen to get themselves deepsixed (maybe) in either Plebs 3 or The Zombie Trigger 2. Or maybe something else. Who knows?

In other news, the brutal juggernaut that is Rejected For Content will continue to stampede over all and sundry with no remorse, no regard and certainly no signs of slowing down. I made mention of a new disturbing entity that I have brewing which led some to question whether this was going to be something of a replacement for RFC. Short answer, no. Long answer, fuck no.

GET REJECTED(3)

Rejected For Content has so many more stories to tell, so many dark corners and recesses to explore, and so many stones to overturn, so there’s no end in sight for that monstrosity. Again, in the interests of involving readers and fans of the series, I might throw open the potential naming or theming of Rejected For Content, to those very people. In fact I already did toss it out there to gauge reactions and see what sort of despicable shit people were keen on seeing for number 6, but nothing officially set in stone. I’ll return to that when the time is right to start building momentum for the RFC machine. So, for all those who fear that Rejected For Content was on it’s last legs, or out the door, or about to fuck off out of here, no need to worry at all. Not only is the open call for RFC6 going to be happening, but so too will something else RFC related. The latter will potentially occur before anything RFC6 does; we’ll see.

As for the other WetWorks entity I made mention of just above and on Facebook leading to those queries about RFC, well, this isn’t going to be a replacement, it’s going to be something completely different and something to run alongside Rejected For Content. I’m looking forward to divulging some information about this, but again, I’m waiting to do that until I clear some projects. I will say this though; it will be extreme, it will be controversial and without doubt it is bound to upset some folks and ruffle a few feathers. I haven’t yet decided whether it is going to be thrown open, or if it will be invite-only, but I am leaning toward the latter. Which means, as I stated on the Facebook status, that some time shortly, I will be actively seeking for collusion and involvement from suitably deranged, disturbed, extreme, perverse sanguinary scribes. I already have a mental list of folk I’m keen on asking-or should that be a list of mentals?-which is why I’m a little keener on making the project an invite-only thing. Primarily because I know that the folk I’m interested in asking to be part of it, can write the type of material I’ll be seeking. Extreme inkslingers who aren’t afraid to get dirty, bloody, offensive, yeah, you get the gist.

That isn’t to say I won’t throw it open at some later stage, we’ll wait and see how this excursion into extremity pans out. As I said, I’m anticipating that it will stir some people up, but then again, everything does these days.

dual depravity initial wrap

Dual Depravity hasn’t been forgotten either; there will be more volumes of that forthcoming at some stage down the track, with various authors getting involved for those books, but for now, fucking projects, lots of projects. Not enough time to get everything done, and of course, me claiming to ease back on the anthos and concentrate on novels this year worked out a treat didn’t it? Committed myself to a pile of those…

Anyway, that’s enough of that. One more chapter to write on this novel and I’m done, so best I get to that.

JIM GOFORTH HORROR AUTHOR(6)

JEA AWARDS 2015/WITH TOOTH AND CLAW/COLLECTION RUMINATIONS

I wrote a post about awards last year so I won’t go overboard on repeating everything I said then, I’ll just keep it succinct. Yeah, yeah I know, big ask for me, the guy who loves writing words…a lot of them.

J. Ellington Aston’s annual awards has happened for 2015 and With Tooth And Claw managed to pick one up for Collection of the Year. My bottom line in writing is that I do it because I simply love to write and my head is a constant churn of stories demanding to be written, but it is most definitely a cool thing to have other folks dig your work and enjoy the stories as much as you enjoyed writing them.

wtac award

With Tooth And Claw came out in February this year, and while it’s been a little more of a slow burner than Plebs, it has garnered several great reviews and moved well in several countries. It crops up every so often on the top 100 Sea Stories category on Amazon, which amuses me no end, since the closest to water any of the tales get is a thunderstorm in Cavedwellers.

Comprised of seven pieces (three of which are more novella length than short story-hey, I write long stories, long books…I love it) With Tooth And Claw is my first collection, and what will be the first of many. I have mentioned before that I intend to release a collection of shorts/novellas in between each novel I put out, so consequently, the majority of shorts that I’m writing at the moment, won’t be destined for specific anthologies as they have been in previous years, but will be solely for compilation in my own collections. Since the next book to be forthcoming from me is the black/death metal undead splatterpunk opus Undead Fleshcrave: The Zombie Trigger, it’s safe to say you can expect the ensuing book to be another macabre bunch of extreme horror tales. Then, of course the follow-up(s) to Plebs will follow.

For those who have read With Tooth And Claw, and enjoyed it, hated it, ambivalent about it, left reviews (cheers for that, I love reviews-good, bad and ugly) those particular stories are not all new. In fact, a couple of them are very, very old, written a long time ago and the concept for Cavedwellers is older still. For the most part though, they are newer works, not written for anything specifically, aside from taking up rental space in my twisted imagination, and needing to get spilled in gory ink splatters on the page. While any more collections to come from me will primarily be new and previously unpublished pieces, I might happen to slip in an older tale or two, and possibly some of those who have been included in prior anthologies.

wtac authors choice

I’m not overly fanatical about the idea of putting together a book of stories which have been previously published for the following reason.

If one is a fan of a particular author, it might be reasonably safe to assume that they’ve sought out the majority of works that particular author has written, or has read the various stories they’ve put out in different books. I know when I seek out a collection of a favourite author, I’m mostly interested in reading a bunch of new stories, or at least works which I’m not familiar with. To me, grabbing a collection of stories, only to find they’re all just reprints of stuff I’ve already read, is a little bit like cheating the reader. So, rest assured, any collection I put out is not going to follow that trajectory, bar perhaps one or two stories which will be derived from maybe lesser known, or not as widely read, anthologies. It’s the same ideology for me, behind writing big books. Give the readers something to really sink their teeth into and get immersed in, and give them new material. If they’re part of your fanbase, it’s a fair bet they’ve already read those stories you have in separate books, so don’t screw them by reselling the same shit they’ve already read. That’s just my own personal opinion on the concept and I’m sure plenty would see it differently, as in a ‘best of album’ or some shit, but at this stage in the game, something like that is not going to be in my plans. New books will mean new stories.

On a final note though, I have to give a massive shout-out to my brother in horror and metal, the incomparable Toneye Eyenot. This legend’s debut, The Scarlett Curse, won the Authors Choice Award for Book of the Year and it is thoroughly desevred. Nobody deserves success, acknowledgement and recognition more than this guy, and I’m extremely proud of him and everything he has achieved. He is going to be a major force.

scarlett curse

Brilliant cover artist and author Michael Fish Fisher (the man behind the entire Rejected For Content series cover art and myriad others) won Editors Choice for Book of the Year with DC’s Dead, while Kent Hill’s Straight To Video anthology picked up Editors choice for Anthology of the Year. Big congrats to all involved.

For those who haven’t yet read With Tooth And Claw, here’s the link.

http://smarturl.it/withtoothandclaw

And here is the link for The Scarlett Curse

http://www.amazon.com/Scarlett-Curse-Sacred-Blade-Profanity-ebook/dp/B00ZDPCNQ6/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1442892536&sr=1-1&keywords=toneye+eyenot

DC’s Dead

http://www.amazon.com/DCs-Dead-Michael-Fisher-ebook/dp/B00N738A68/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1442892874&sr=1-1&keywords=dc%27s+dead

Straight To Video

http://www.amazon.com/Straight-Video-Anthology-Movie-Awesomeness-ebook/dp/B00X6QZLLI/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1442892943&sr=1-1&keywords=straight+to+video

In any case, before I start to make a liar out of myself with that ‘keep it succinct’ disclaimer at the start, I’m out of here.

WTAC AUTHOR NAME

WITH TOOTH AND CLAW

After a bit of a minor delay, my latest released With Tooth and Claw is now out everywhere, available in paperback and Kindle format.

The book is a collection of macabre tales, comprised of seven pieces, three of which are novella length. Essentially these three stories are long enough to constitute being released as separate standalone works, but I have never been a fan of the idea of single novellas, though they are a big thing these days. Personally, I prefer a book to be a book sized one, a little more for folks to sink their teeth into (no pun intended) than a single story, so any shorts I happen to write which aren’t for various anthologies will always come out as a collection. With that being said, I actually have plans to release collections relatively frequently, in between novels, which is the case here, with this coming out between Plebs and my upcoming novel Undead Fleshcrave: The Zombie Trigger which is complete and awaiting first edits.

While these stories are all going to be new to readers, technically one or two of them are actually quite old, written a long time ago and the concept behind one of the more recent longer pieces is even older still.

As one might expect from me, they are bloody, visceral, visually explicit and full of dark imagery, though maybe not quite to the extent of some of those I’ve written (Rejected For Content 1 and 2 spring to mind), but if you’ve read my work before, rest assured they are all definitely in the same vein.

So without rambling on too much more-I’ll save that for my next post-I’ll drop the link off for it. Swing round, check it out, feel free to leave a review if you so choose, as always I’m happy with good, bad or ugly, and let me know what you think.

Chad, Vincent and their friends are going camping. Chad doesn’t even like camping. The only reason he is even here is because the delectable Denise has come along too.
Now they are all assembled around the campfire drinking and trying to scare one another with lame horror stories. None of which are particularly scary. Chad is hoping they hurry it up and move along to some more risqué games, preferably involving Denise.
However, Vincent has one more tale to tell…
Nick and Maree just want to have a good night together. But people won’t stop messing with them. The town bully, the self-perceived beauty queen, even the local cop want to give them some sort of hell.
Maybe that is a very bad idea…
Stu just wants to get himself as drunk as possible and visit all the strip clubs in town, ogling and deriding all the naked dancers he can. Pretty much the same thing he does every night. He thought he knew all the exotic dancing bars and strip clubs, but apparently not. Club Styx isn’t somewhere he has ever been before…
John has come home from the war, a deserter, sneaking back into the country. He hasn’t come back the same as he went away. He’s brought something with him, a curse, a contagion. And it isn’t something he can contain. When it starts to spread, it is going to spread like wildfire and there will be no stopping it…
Cody and Jeff are supposed to be on a simple stakeout mission, warned by their brutal criminal boss to follow his orders to the letter. Boredom and curiosity are going to get the better of them, and this basic job is about to get a whole lot more involved…
Donna can’t let herself fall asleep. Because when she does, the same thing happens every time. People die in a grisly violent fashion. She’s tried everything to halt the inevitable, but she’s so sleepy. And drifting off…
Josh and Megan are hiking with their group, aiming to reach the peak of notorious Mount MacGinnis. When a freakish thunderstorm drives them all to seek sanctuary in the many caves existing in the mountainside, the duo take the opportunity to explore their developing relationship. However, there are others in this group who appear to know a little more about the mysterious cave network than they are letting on.
Before long, it isn’t just going to be heavy rain and blustery wind pouring havoc down on these unwary shelter seekers…
There is a whole lot of gruesome death and violence inflicted within this collection of macabre tales, but the majority of it contains one common element. Weapons and tools are not utilised here, bloody havoc is caused, with tooth and claw.

http://smarturl.it/withtoothandclaw